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CHAPTER
THREE
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PAUL LARGENT  |  1900 - 1983  |  TIPTON  OK
The Largent family is well known in Oklahoma pharmaceutical circles. Paul Largent

was one of the owners of The Tipton Drugstore and later
, after World War Two, he

bought out his partner and renamed the store Largent Drug Store. He was a renowned

civic leader in Tipton and the drugstore was a meeting place for residents of all ages.

After Paul's wife, Ann died in 1957, he remarried. His second wife, Colleen was an

amateur poet and on the occasion of Paul's retirement she wrote this verse entitled:
Paul received numerous awards and designations over his career. His son,

Parke Largent has also had a fine career both as a pharmacist, a drugstore

owner and as a teacher of Pharmacy Law at OU.
For Sale
"This small drugstore was established in 1910, that was
 way back when.
Asafedita, Tr. Belladonna, oil of cloves & mentholatum were
 sold cheap way back then.
At the fountain, you had a choice of soft drinks, ice cream
 candy and gum.
Come Saturday afternoon, to town everyone would come.
The mirror on the back bar was polished oh so bright.
Everyone was so afraid the mirror would be broken the day
 of the fight.
The tobacco case was a very popular place in the store.
Just sell one cigar to a fellow and he'd always come back
 for more.
In the southwest, this store was one of the best.
It kept the druggest so busy he hardly had time to rest.
This store today is up for sale.
Come one, come all, get your bids in the mail.
Paul Largent, the druggist wants so bad to retire.
Have some fun and travel before he expires."
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Asafetida Bags were
used as poultice
-type
treatment for a
multitude of ailments
in the early days of
pharmacy. Soaked in
various liquid potions
the cloth bag would be
worn generally around
the neck of the
distressed patient to
ward off and/or cure
the particular illness.  
ALFRED REED  |  1869 - 1954  |  NORMAN OK
Along with his father and brothers, Fred Reed came to Oklahoma during the Land

Run of 1889 in a covered wagon. The trip from his home in Kansas proved  

to be more dangerous than they had thought.


Many creeks and streams flooded over their banks that year making it nearly

impossible for the covered wagon to cross the Salt Fork of the Arkansas River.

Their creative solution was to lay down planks on the railroad bridge so the

horses could slowly pull the huge wagon and the Reed family belongings across

to the other side.


Once in Oklahoma, Fred's father filed a claim on land that was later known as

Orlando, but Fred was too young to file a claim of his own so on July 1 of 1889 he

moved to Norman where he worked for a former Kansas neighbor, Tyler Blake.


In 1891 he became a partner in the Tyler Palace Drug Store and later its sole

owner. He retired in 1950 and on April 29, 1954, sixty one years and seven

days after he crossed the Arkansas River, he visited his old drugstore to buy

a cigar.


Alfred Reed sat down in a booth and died of cardiac arrest.
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SCRIPT FROM 1920

No doubt, the patient
taking this prescription
was in dire need of help!

Enlarge the image to read
the doctor's suggested
treatment.

Perhaps Mr. Morrow could
have benefited from this
medicine to help with his
head injury!
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