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THE OKLAHOMA DRUGSTORE STORIES SITE IS OPERATED BY
THE OKLAHOMA PHARMACY HERITAGE FOUNDATION, A NON PROFIT 501(c)(3)
TULLIS DAVID CARTER  |  1895- 1965  |   VICI  OK
Tullis, "Tullie" Carter was a native of Arkansas and as did many during that era,

his family moved to Oklahoma around the time of Statehood in 1907.

Tullie attended the public schools in Lawton and later, in 1915, he moved to

Columbus
, NM to work at the Meadow Drug Store. Columbus, was a small

town close to the Mexican border and in 1916 it became a target of

the Mexican revolutionary, Pancho Villa. Villa's gang burned the business district

of Columbus including the Meadow Drug Store. The US 13th Cavalry stationed at

Camp Furlong just outside of town was unable to contain the "Villistas". Ten

civilians and several US soldiers were killed in the raid.


Tullis Carter quickly moved back to Lawton securing a job at Powell's Drugstore!


In 1928, Tullie purchased a drug store in Vici which he and his wife Lula Mae

operated Vici Drug Company until they died.


Tullie recalled a tale his father had told about the infamous Chief Geronimo,

who he said, charged twenty-five cents for a look into his covered wagon

where he claimed to have a jacket and quilt made from scalps.
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Indian Medicine
Shows were high
on entertainment
and on selling
remedies that may
or may not have
been legitimate.

Kickapoo Oil
sold under various
names was one
of those remedies.
WALTER RAY JARRETT |  1886- 1947  |   WETUMKA  OK
Walter spent his youth in Wetumka Oklahoma and eventually opened

Jarrett Drug Company in his hometown. As with many of the early pharmacists,

Walter Jarrett had other additional business interests. He became a land and oil

investor. He was an advocate for pharmacy law and helped craft state requirements

necessary to practice as a pharmacist. He also became successful in the

development and marketing of pharmaceuticals and growing his oil interests.


Walter and his wife Clyde (Sipes) were prominent in the Oklahoma City social scene

and were good friends with oil millionaires, Charles Frederick and Bernice Urshel.


On July 12, 1933,
the two couples were playing bridge at the Urshel mansion in

Oklahoma City. Suddenly, George Kelly Barnes, better known as "Machine Gun Kelly"

and his gang
broke into the residence intent on kidnapping Urshel and holding him for

ransom. The outlaws didn't know which man was Urshel, so they took both men

from the house blindfolded. When they discovered the identity of Walter and Urshel,

they released Walter Jarrett minus the $50.00 he had on him. They kept Urshell but

let Walter go about eight miles north of OKC on a deserted backroad.


Walter found his way back and reported the crime to police. A $200,000 ransom

was paid and Urshell was released by the Kelly Gang.  They were eventually caught

in Tennessee and returned to Oklahoma to face charges of kidnapping.


The testimony of Walter Jarrett and Charles Urshell resulted in the conviction of

Machine Gun Kelly, his wife Catherine and his notorious gang all of whom spent

many years in prision.
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GO TO
CHAPTER
SEVEN
Ladies toiletries
and cosmetics
were found on
the drugstore
shelves along
with perfumes,
hair treatments
and many other
sundries needed
by f
ashionable men
and women.
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