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CHAPTER TWO
RALPH THEODORE ENIX  |  1910 - 2002  |  KINGFISHER OK
As a citizen of a small rural town, he recognized the need for drugstores, pharmacies

and quality health care in these tiny towns, so he established a fund to provide

financial assistance to junior and senior students in the form of loans. In return, the

students committed to practice their health care services in the rural areas. Ralph

was the trustee of the loan fund and in addition, he provided personal financial aid

to many of these students to help with their education.


Ralph Enix received numerous awards, belonged to a vast number of pharmacy

and civic clubs and associations but no other accomplishment can out weigh his

dedication to and support for the establishment of the Oklahoma Frontier Drugstore

Museum in Guthrie, Oklahoma.There, learning about pharmaceuticals and drugstores

of the frontier days is an education in itself and the spirit of early pharmacists like

Ralph Enix is alive and well.
JAMES MARION MORROW  | 1860 - 1921  |  TULSA OK
Originally from Missouri, James Morrow worked in various positions in drugstores

in Iowa and Kansas. In 1891 he purchased a drugstore on Main Street in Tulsa

Oklahoma. Later in 1900 he sold out and returned to Missouri. It was there while

hunting wild turkey, he was accidentally shot in the head. It was serious enough

that he was thought to be dead but as it turned out, he survived! He lived several

more years dying in 1921.
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WILLIAM McKAY DOUGAN  |  1846 - 1908   
INDIAN & OK TERRITORY  |  RED ROCK
& PERRY OK
There are several fascinating stories involving the man known simply as McKay.

He moved from place to place in the early Indian and Oklahoma Territories

serving the tribal nations as a physician and pharmacist. He spent much of his time

on the reservations and was well thought of by the people he served.


McKay published a newspaper, the Indian Herald during a stint at the Osage

Agency where he brought
a home for $1,200 per annum. He had an unusual hobby

during that time, collecting wild animals. He had two wildcats, coyotes and

badgers. The wildcats loved to play with the medicine bottles so eventually they

had to be moved to avoid being discovered by the government inspector.


McKay died in 1908 from complications from an accident that severed his leg.

The accident was a result of his trying to jump onto a moving train.
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SAFE...
ARSENIC
COMPLECTION
WAFERS

A product for women
sold by Dr. James P.
Campbell. (prior, we
believe to the FDA)
Have your doctor
prescribe
Chocolate Coated
Poison Tablets...

The Eli Lilly Company
sold this for the
treatment
of Sun Cholera.
Ralph Enix was dedicated to his chosen profession of Pharmacy and he was

well known for serving in the small communities that dotted the landscapes of

Oklahoma. He and his brother Cecil, a pharmacist in Hennessey,  headed

a Tuberculosis drive in 1949 that resulted in sixty-five percent of the county

residents receiving chest x-rays to detect this dreaded disease. In addition,

Ralph was in charge of vaccines for Polio and a statewide campaign to immunize

for Rubella.
CLICK THE
SMALL IMAGES
UNDER THE
STORIES FOR
MORE DETAIL!
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When Tuberculosis was running
rampant in the United States, the
practice of spitting in a public area
was discouraged. It was theorized
that if the hem of a lady's skirt came
into contact with the aforementioned
substance, which was a natural
carrier of the disease, it might end
up on a rug or in the laundry basket
of a family and transmit the dreaded
condition. The
"Don't Spit on Sidewalk"
brick served both as a reminder and
a warning.
DON'T SPIT
ON
SIDEWALK